AN ODD LITTLE SPORT

"YA GOTTA LOVE THIS GAME"
HERE IS A VIDEO OF THE 1952 WORLD SERIES GAME 7
BETWEEN THE NY YANKEES AND BROOKLYN DODGERS

CLICK HERE OR TYPE THE FOLLOWING INTO YOUR BROWSER

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqZnPQnxO9U


NOTE THE BAGGY UNIFORMS AND THE LACK OF ANY KIND OF HELMET FOR BATTER OR CATCHER!
(The Yankees won game seven 4-2 for their 4th straight title.)

There were many famous players in this series including Jackie Robinson, Mickey Mantle and Duke Snider.  Roy Campanella was a highly skilled catcher who saw his career cut short jn tragedy.  The Dodgers were moving to Los Angeles in 1958 but Campanella never joined the team in California.  He was paralyzed in an auto accident in January of 1958.  Salaries were such in baseball that many players held off season jobs.  Campanella's car hit an ice patch as he drove home from the small store he owned.



NOTE THE AREA ROUGHLY BETWEEN THE UMPIRE AND THE WHITE CIRCLE.  THERE IS A GLOVE THERE. 
SOME PLAYERS IN 1952 STILL HAD THE HABIT OF TOSSING THEIR GLOVES ON THE FIELD WHEN THEIR
TEAM WENT TO BAT!  ALSO PLEASE NOTE THE SIZE AND SHAPE OF THE GLOVES YOU SEE IN THE VIDEO.
(This may have been a habit born in the days when gloves were scare and had to be shared between teams.)


THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS

















PITCHERS AND CATCHERS RULE
The original pitching distance was about 46 feet with no mound.  Catchers in the early days set up back enough to catch the ball on a bounce.   That didn't
last long and safety equipment allowed the catcher toplay right behind the batter.  Today it's Sixty feet six inches and fastballs of 90-100  MPH are common.

SUBMARINE


STRAIGHT OVERHAND


SIDEARM


THREE QUARTERS



Do you get the idea I'm proud?  I'VE USED THIS PHOTO BEFORE.The man standing second from the left was 19-1 pitching for his team
in an obscure league in the Wisconsin Prairie.  He was William Stockland, my grandfather.  When not pitching he worked on the railroad.


THE HITTERS HAVE GOTTEN GOOD TOO!